What Is A Raised Toilet Seat Called ?

by | Beginners Info, Personal Hygiene

If you are a novice in the world of raised toilet seats you will find the number of different types, and names, pretty darn confusing. With that in mind I have set out to clarify things, as much as I can.

Raised toilet seats are often also called risers, elevated toilet seats, tall seats, spacers, clippers, raised toilet seats with legs and toilet safety frame with seats, amongst other names.

Raised and elevated toilet seats are the same thing – they are seats which are placed on the toilet to raise the height of the seat.

Raised or elevated toilet seat with legs – these are models of seats which are a little wider and have legs on the corners – they still rest on, and attach to, the toilet bowl.

Risers – are round, or oval, rings of plastic which correspond to the shape of either standard or elongated toilet bowls.

Risers are installed under an existing toilet seat and lift it higher.

Safety frames with raised or elevated seats – are seats which are integrated into a frame which holds them above the toilet

Bedside commodes – are also often used as raised toilet seats, especially the 3-in-1 bedside commode, which is designed to work as a raised toilet seat, toilet safety frame and a bedside commode.

Raised and elevated toilet seats, safety frames with seats, and bedside commodes, all have a ranges of models which are designed to take people of different weights, and seats for larger individuals are prefaced with the term “bariatric”.

There are bariatric safety frames with elevated, or raised, seats and bariatric 3-in-1 commodes. 

All of these terms are frequently mixed up and people selling the items get the names wrong (I am particularly referring to sellers on Amazon, as they fill their product names with terms to sell them more easily), all adding to the confusion of the names.

Now that I have dealt with the names which are used for the broader categories, I can discuss the different names given to the seats within those categories. 

Raised or elevated toilet seats

The following are names given to different types of raised toilet seat which are either attached to the bowl, or to the existing seat.

Big John toilet seats

Big John Toilet seats are oversized toilet seats which are installed on a toilet in the same way as an everyday toilet seat. They are though a lot wider, and have a 2.5″ lift.

The seats bolt to the toilet after you have removed your existing toilet seat.

On the underside the seats have a special no-slip area around the rim which stops the seat from sliding all over the place. 

Here are examples of Big John seats –

  • 1200 lb – Big John 2.5 ” original toilet seat w/lid, (universal), Prod. No. 1-W
  • 1200 lb – Big John 2.5 ” original toilet seat w/lid, (universal), Prod. No. 2-CR
  • 1200 lb – Big John 2.5 ” original toilet seat w/lid, open front, (universal), Prod. No. 3-W
  • 1200 lb – Big John 2.5 ” original toilet seat w/out lid, open front (universal), Prod. No. 4-W
  • 800 lb – Big John 1.5 ” standard toilet seat w/lid, open front (universal), Prod. No. 6-W
  • 1200 lb – Big John 2.5 ” classic toilet seat w/out lid, open front (universal), Prod. No. 7-W

Tall seats or Spacer seats

These are toilet seats which  have small legs or spacers on the underside of the seat.

The installation is just a case of removing the existing seat and replacing it with the “Tall” or Spacer” seat.

The seats come in 2 or 3 inch models, with or without lids, with or without an opening at the front, and models are made for both standard and elongated toilets.

These seats do not have armrests, or handles, of any type.

An examples of these seats is –

  • Centoco 3L440STS-001 raised toilet seat with lid

Clip On raised toilet seats

Clip-On seats are a type of portable raised toilet seat which is a quick on – off solution for traveling.

The seats are made in heights of 2 – 4 inches.

The seat has an opening at the front, which when squeezed allows the raised seat to be clipped on to the seat of the existing toilet.

There are no fixings, or front locking devices, such as you find on some of the more permanent models.

The seats do not come with armrests or handles.

 

Some examples of these are –

  • Ability Supertstore 4 inch Clip On Raised Toilet Seat
  • Performance Health Novelle 4″ Clip On Raised Toilet Seat

Bubble Seats

Certain raised toilet seats, which look like big white donuts, have become known as “Bubble Seats” – this is not an official name for them.

The “Bubble Seats” are attached, once the existing seat is in the upright position, by placing them on the rim of the toilet bowl and giving a good hard push downwards.

Some models have grip pads, but other than that there are no fastenings, bolts, or clamps.

The seats are generally either for standard or elongated models, and very few have a lid.

A few models of this type of seat have a lip at the beck which slots under the inside rim of the toilet seat to stop them from tipping forwards.

Bubble Seats range from 4 – 6 inches in height.

 

  • The NRS Comfort Raised Toilet Seat
  • Medline 4 3/4 inch Elevated Heavy Duty Raised Toilet Seat
  • Carex 4 inch Quick Lock Raised Toilet Seat (example with lip at the back)
  • Carex 5.5 inch Raised Toilet Seat
  • AquaSense Portable 4 inch Raised Toilet Seat – standard toilets
  • HealthSmart  Portable 4 3/4 inch Raised Toilet Seat -(Universal – fits all toilets apparently)
  • Herdegen Contact Plus 5 inch Raised Toilet Seat-(Universal – fits all toilets apparently)
  • Yunga Tart 4 3/4 inch Raised Toilet Seat w/out arms (Universal – fits all toilets apparently)

Clipper seats

There is actually only one company which that makes these seats – Herdegen.

The clipper seat installs quickly on the toilet seat once the existing seat is in the upright position, and all models give a lift of 4.3 inches in height.

The raised seat is placed on the rim of the toilet bowl, the inside edge drops a few inches inside the bowl, and 4 clips on the outside are pushed up against the bowl to gain grip.

There are 3 models without armrests, 2 models with armrests and two models with both legs and armrests.

The models without legs –

 

  • Herdegen Clipper I 4.3″ raised toilet seat
  • Herdegen Clipper II 4.3″ raised toilet seat
  • Herdegen Clipper III 4.3″ raised toilet seat w/ lid
  • Herdegen Clipper IV 4.3″ raised toilet seat, detachable arms for transfer
  • Herdegen Clipper V 4.3″ raised toilet seat w/ lid, detachable arms for transfer

Seats with side fixings and a front “bracket” –

A lot of the middle range seats fix to the toilet using plastic side fixings, and usually a bracket at the front – a sort of plastic clamping system.

These seats are available in heights ranging from 2 – 6 inches, with and without lids, and are either for standard, or elongated toilet bowls.

The weight capacities depend upon the model you choose.

The names of the different seats often have included in them phrases which indicate that they have some type of fixing – “Safe Lock” and “Clamp-On”, “Easy Fit”

 

Examples of raised seats using this system are –

 

  • Aquasense 4 inch Raised Toilet Seat with lid
  • Aidapt Viscount 6″ raised toilet seat w/out lid
  • Carex 4.25″ Safe-Lock raised toilet seat
  • Homecraft Ashby 2″ Easy fit raised toilet seat
  • Homecraft Ashby 4″ Easy fit raised toilet seat
  • Homecraft Ashby 6″ Easy fit raised toilet seat
  • Vaunn Medical Clamp-on 4inch Raised Toilet Seat
  • Carex Universal 4 1/2 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Safe Lock
  • PCP 4″ Raised Toilet Seat
  • Drive Medical 6 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Lock

Front Locking raised toilet seats –

These are the most solidly fixed of the seats which attach to the bowl, and come in heights mostly of 4 – 5 inches.

They are called “front locking” due to a type of clamp that they have at the front of the seat – the front clamp is usually accompanied by a lip, at the back of the seat.

The lip slots under the rim of the bowl at the back to stop a seat from tipping forwards when a user is getting up.

These seats can come with or without armrests or handles, but the majority come with.

The names of the seats sometimes contain the name of the patented clamping system they use – “E-Z Lock” is an example.

    Some examples of this type –

     

    • Carex E-Z Lock 5 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Arms
    • Medokare 4.5 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Arms
    • Vive 5 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Padded Handles

    Risers

    Risers are the only system for a raised toilet seat which goes under the seat, and are available in heights of 2 – 4 “.

    To install the riser –

    • the toilet seat is removed
    • the riser placed on the rim of the toilet
    • the seat is bolted back on with the riser in place underneath it

    Risers can be bought with, and without arms, and like a seat they can have a hinge so they lift up for cleaning, or not.

    The following are examples of risers –

     

    • Carex 3.5″ toilet seat elevator, (riser – elongated)
    • Carex 3.5″ toilet seat elevator, (riser – standard)
    • Nova 3.5″ raised toilet seat riser  (standard)
    • Nova 3.5″ raised toilet seat riser  (elongated)
    • Nova 3.5″ raised toilet seat riser with arms  (standard)
    • Nova 3.5″ raised toilet seat riser with arms  (elongated)
    • Nova 3.5″ hinged toilet seat riser  (standard)
    • Nova 3.5″ hinged toilet seat riser  (elongated)

    Raised toilet seats with legs

    These are raised seats with front locking mechanisms which also have two legs on each side. They are typically a few inches wider between the armrests than the “front-locking” raised toilet seats.

      Some examples of raised toilet seats with legs –

       

      • Maddak Tall-Ette Elevated Toilet Seat With Legs
      • Mobb Raised Toilet Seat With Legs
      • Herdegen Clipper VI 4.3 inch raised toilet seat w/ out lid, armrests and adjustable legs
      • Herdegen Clipper VII raised toilet seat with lid, armrests and adjustable legs

      Safety frames with elevated seats

      A safety frame with a raised toilet seat is metal a frame with a toilet seat in it.

      The frame is placed over the toilet and the seat is above the toilet bowl.

      To use the frame, you simply place the frame over the toilet once you have the existing toilet seat in the upright position.

      Make sure of course that the legs are adjusted to a height so that it is tall enough to be placed over the toilet.

      There are models for larger individuals which are “extra wide“, “bariatric“, “tall and “heavy duty“.

       

      Some examples of frames are –

      • PCP raised toilet seat and safety frame 2-in-1
      • Aidapt President Bariatric raised toilet seat and frame 
      • Aidapt Bariatric Solo Skandia raised toilet seat and frame
      • Lattice commode toilet seat and frame 
      • Ashby Lux toilet seat and frame, adjustable height
      • NRS Healthcare Mowbray lite toilet frame and seat
      • NRS Healthcare Mowbray lite toilet frame and seat
      • NRS Healthcare Mowbray toilet seat and frame, adjustable width
      • NRS Healthcare Mowbray toilet seat and frame floor fixed, Extra wide
      • NRS Healthcare Mowbray toilet seat and frame, Extra wide

      Bedside commodes used as raised toilet seats

      As I noted earlier, there are models for larger individuals called “tall”, “bariatric” or “heavy duty“, and also “extra wide” and this is true for bedside commodes as well.

      If you want to know more about the weight capacities of different raised toilet seats, commodes, and frames, you can refer to my article where I list over 180 different models with their weight capacities, amongst other things, here.

      3-in-1, or All-in-1, or portable bedside commodes can be used

      • as a bedside commode
      • over the toilet as a raised toilet seat
      • as a toilet safety frame

      To use them as a raised toilet seat the legs just need to adjusted to the correct height, and the commode without its pale can be placed over the toilet once its seat is in the upright position.

       

      Examples of commodes which you can use over a toilet –

       

      • Nova drop arm 3-in-1 commode
      • Probasics drop arm 3-in-1 commode
      • Medline  3-in-1 steel bedside commode
      • Probasics 3-in-1 folding commode
      • TFI Healthcare wide 3-in-1 commode w/ elongated seat
      • Tuffcare extra wide drop arm commode chair
      • Lumex 6438A imperial collection 3-in-1 steel drop arm
      • Nova heavy duty commmode w/ extra wide seat
      • Probasics bariatric commode extra wide seat
      • Performance Health heavy-duty commode w/ elongated seat

      Which sort of raised toilet seat is best for an elderly parent ?

      To decide what type of seat is suitable for an elderly parent, it’s important to ask yourself a certain number of questions.

      These are just some examples of questions you may want to ask –

      General questions

      • how much room is there for sitting down and standing up ?
      • is a walker being used to back up and sit down on the seat ?
      • why are they using raised toilet seat ?
      • how old is the person ?
      • are they confident, or nervous, about using a raised toilet seat ? Happy or unhappy ?
      • how confident is the person about backing up to the toilet ?
      • to feel confident about using a raised toilet seat does the person need other equipment ?
      • is this a short term, or long term, situation ?
      • if long term, bear in mind that as the person gets older they will get weaker, and that you may want to buy something which will be suitable in the future as well ?

      Physical questions

      • what physical shape is the person in ?
      • does the person have problems with mobility ?
      • how good or bad is the person’s balance ?
      • are there problems with vision ?
      • how strong, or frail is the person ?
      • does the person has a strong grip ?
      • do they have good coordination ?
      • is the person able to clean themselves afterwards ?
      • does the person sit back with control, or do they give their seat a jolt ?
      • will the person be needing armrests to sit down and stand up ?
      • will you need a bariatric seat if the seat is for a larger person ?
      • what width seat does the person need ?

      Medical reasons

      • are there any specific medical problems ?
      • do you need to ask any questions of the person’s doctor or nurse ?
      • if there are any problems with vision, will the person need extra grab bars or bigger armrests ?
      • is this a temporary post-operation situation ?
      • if it is for a long term medical condition, what does the condition require ?

      Asking questions such as these should help you to decide what type of seat is appropriate for your particular situation.

      I’m Gareth and I’m the owner of Looking After Mom and Dad.com

      I have been a caregiver for over 10 yrs and share all my tips here.

      Gareth Williams

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      Summary
      Article Name
      What is a raised toilet seat called ?
      Description
      Raised toilet seats are often also called risers, elevated toilet seats, tall seats, spacers, clippers, raised toilet seats with legs and toilet safety frame with seats, amongst other names
      Author
      Publisher Name
      Lookingaftermomandad.com