What Is The Highest Raised Toilet Seat ? With 46 Examples

by | Beginners Info, Personal Hygiene, Safety

In the summer of 2018 my mom had a hip replacement, and as her caregiver I had to procure all the required kit for her rehab.

A raised toilet seat was one of the most important pieces of equipment we were going to need, so that mom would be able to protect her hip when using the toilet, and not hurt herself.

So, what is the highest raised toilet seat ? The highest raised toilet seats that you can find are between 28 and 24 inches from the floor, but this is not all you should consider.

What is a raised toilet seat, and what is it for ?

There are quite a few different types of raised toilet seat and designs, but they all have the same function, which is to raise the height of the toilet seat from the floor.

People with disabilities, mobility issues, the elderly, and people who have just had knee, or hip operations, and who cannot, or should not, sit as low as a normal toilet seat will use raised toilet seats to make it easier to get on and off the toilet.

The raised toilet seats prevent people from further injuring themselves, and help to support areas of the body which have been weakened by surgery.

For some people it just makes the coordination of the movements easier, especially if they are lacking strength, or have issues with their vision, and for whom backing up and sitting can cause difficulty.

What are the different types of raised toilet seat ?

Toilet seat riser 

A riser is an oval, or round, ring of plastic of a specific height (from 2 to 4 inches) which is attached to the toilet under your existing toilet seat.

The riser is attached placing the seat bolts through the seat, as usual, and then through the riser, and on through the bolt holes in the toilet.

An example of a riser –

 

  • Nova 3 1/2 inch toilet seat riser

A hinged toilet seat riser

These risers, are only different in that like your toilet seat they have a hinge, and can be lifted to clean underneath them.

They attach in exactly the same way as an ordinary riser.

An example of a hinged riser –

 

  • Maddak 4 inch hinged toilet riser

Clip On combi raised toilet/riser seat which clips

Clip On toilet seats are open at the front, like a horse shoe, and are simply clipped onto your existing toilet seat.

There are no bolts or clamps.

The seats come in 2 and 3 inch high models.

An example of a Clip-on seat –

 

  • Ability Superstore 4 inch Clip On Raised Toilet Seat

Tall toilet seat or seat with spacers 

These seats replace your existing toilet seat, and are attached through the same holes.

The seats have legs, or spacers, of specific heights on the underside.

The seats come in 2 and 3 inch high models.

An example of one of these seats is –

 

  • Centoco 3L440STS-001 raised toilet seat with lid

Raised or elevated toilet seats 

These seats are a seat and a riser combined, and attach to the bowl of the toilet, once you have removed your seat.

The seats come in a variety of different heights from 2 through to 6 inch models, depending on the design type and the brand.

The method of attaching the different types of raised seats to the seat also varies, and some are far more secure than others.

Here are the basic types –

Bubble seats – these are made of a compressed foam and you simply push them down over the bowl of your toilet, and they are designed to grip.

The seats have no clamps, locks or bolts to secure them to the bowl.

These models do not come with armrests, cannot be adjusted in height, and have a lower weight capacity than seats which secure to the bowl with clamping or locking systems.

An example of this type of seat is –

 

  • The NRS Comfort raised toilet seat

Seats with side fixings – a large number of raised seat designs have clamps or locking mechanisms on the sides of the seat towards the rear – these lock onto the toilet bowl as the clamps, or bolts, are tightened.

These seats do not have armrests, and the weight capacity will be lower than the raised toilet seats with front locking mechanisms.

An example of this type of seat is –

 

  • Vaunn Medical Clamp-on 4inch Raised Toilet Seat

Raised toilet seats with front locking mechanisms – there are various brands which manufacture a raised toilet seat with a clamp at the front of the seat, and a lip at the back which slots under the inside rim of the toilet.

These seats come in heights of 4 or 5 inches depending on the brand.

Most of these models come with armrests, which can be adjustable and removable.

An example of a front locking raised toilet seat is –

 

  • Carex E-Z Lock 5 inch Raised Toilet Seat with Arms

An elevated seat with legs

These are elevated toilet seats which have legs.

The seat can slide up and down the legs to adjust the height – your toilet must not be taller than a certain height, depending on the brand of seat you buy.

These are only made by Maddak or MOBB.

A safety frame with an elevated seat

This type of seat is a metal safety frame with a built-in seat.

The toilet seat on your toilet is either removed, or put in the upright position, and the frame and built in seat are placed over your toilet bowl.

The frames have adjustable heights, armrests and can be made of either aluminum, or steel.

There are also bariatric models for  heavier individuals.

None of the body weight with these frames is placed on the toilet itself, and the legs distribute the weight to the floor.

Portable bedside commode

“3-in-1” commodes, can be used with their commode bucket by the bedside, or just like a safety frame with a seat, they can be placed over the toilet, without their bucket.

To use over the toilet, you simply remove the commode bucket and place the commode over the toilet bowl.

The leg height can be adjusted to generally to around five different heights.

As with the safety frames with elevated seats, you can get the models in aluminum or steel, along with models for different weight capacities.

An example of this type of bedside commode is –

 

  • Drive Medical steel folding bedside commode

Raised seat with mechanical lift

Another option is a toilet lift.

Toilet lifts are for very frail or disabled individuals who don’t have the strength to sit down on, or to get back up from, the toilet seat.

The seat has a built in mechanism which raises and lowers the user.

Some models will be a frame which is on the floor around the toilet with a lift mechanism and a seat –

 

  • The Liftseat Pwered Toilet Lift
  • The Uplift Commode

A different design where the lift attaches to the toilet without legs to the floor is –

 

  • Easy Access Tilt Toilet Lift

The highest type of raised toilet seat

The highest type of raised toilet seating is going to be a bedside commode with a 28 inch seat height placed over a toilet. 

In the US if you use a raised toilet seat which attaches to the toilet, the maximum height you can achieve will be 25 inches.

In the UK the maximum height you can achieve with a seat which attaches to the toilet is lower, because the average toilet is lower than in the US. 

 

One point I would like to make here is that if your elderly parent is a little fragile, the safety frame and seat, or a portable bedside commode which can be placed over the toilet could be a better option than any type of seat which attaches to the rim of the bowl, or to the seat of the toilet, as they are more sturdy and have bigger armrests to grab onto. 

My mom still uses the portable commode placed over the toilet, as she likes the big arm rest and support it gives her.

The fact that it has a frame that takes the weight on the floor, and not a system clamping onto the toilet, also makes her feel safer.

Let’s look raised toilet seat heights in the US

Raised and elevated toilet seats

In the US, standard toilets are around 14 1/2 inches from the floor to the rim of the bowl,  “comfort”, “universal”, or “right height toilets” measure from 16 to 19 inches from the floor to the rim of the bowl (the recommended height being 17 inches including the seat).

This means that the 6 inch raised toilet seats, which fix on to the toilet bowl, and which are not on a frame, or a portable bedside commode, will range from 20 1/2 to 25 1/2 inches depending on the height of your toilet.

On a 19 inch high toilet, a 6 inch raised seat will be 25 inches from floor to top the seat.

  •  2 inches higher than the safety frames where the seat is at 23 inches max from the floor
  • and 2 1/2 inches higher than the normal portable bedside commode seats where the highest seat I found was 22 1/2 inches from the floor
  • but it will be 3 inches lower than the seat of the TFI Extra Tall Bedside Commode which can be adjusted to having the seat at a dizzy 28 inches from the floor – this comes a an equally dizzy price of over 800$ !

Obviously, for the 14 1/2 to 18 inch high toilet bowls the 6 inch seat will be much lower.

There is a toilet with a 20 inch high bowl rim – the Convenient Toilet – but even this will only reach 26 inches with a raised toilet seat of 6 inches, which is still less than the 28 inch maximum seat height of the TFI Extra Tall bedside commode.

6 Inch raised toilet seats –

  • Drive raised toilet seat without lid
  • Drive raised toilet seat with lid
  • Maddack Tall-Ette elevated toilet seat

5 Inch raised toilet seats –

  • Drive Medical elevated seat without arms
  • Drive DeVilbiss elevated seat with removable arms RTL 12027RA
  • Drive Medical raised toilet seat with lock and padded arm rests
  • Carex E lock raised toilet seat without handles
  • Nova elevated toilet seat with removable adjustable arms
  • Nova elevated toilet seat with removable padded handles
  • Vive elevated toilet seat with padded handles
  • Medline locking elevated toilet seat without arm

 

3.5 Inch risers 

Your toilet seat is bolted on top of the riser, so it will make it comparable to a 5 inch raised seat –

  • Carex hinged seat riser
  • Nova toilet riser

Frames with elevated toilet seat

  • Maddack Tall Ette elevated seat with legs – max height is 4 inches above the bowl rim, so 23 inches from floor to seat
  • MOBB elevated toilet seat – max seat height is 23 inches from floor
  • PCP raised toilet seat and safety frame – max seat height is 23 inches from the floor

Portable bedside commodes

The tallest bedside commode I found will raise a 17 inch toilet by 11 inches and a 19 inch toilet by 9 inches.

This Commodes is the TFI Healthcare Extra Tall Bedside Commode, and has a max seat height of 28″. This is a very expensive commode though at a little over 800$.

So, if height is the only concern there are lots of raised and elevated seats which fit onto toilets are at least 1/2 an inch taller than a normal portable bedside commode, but none will match the TFI Extra Tall Bedside Commode.

  • TFI Healthcare Extra Tall bedside commode – max seat height 28 inches from floor
  • Drive Medical portable bedside commode – max seat height 22 1/2 inches from floor
  • Medline steel 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 22 1/2 inches from floor
  • Healthline aluminum folding bedside commode – max seat height 22 1/2 inches from floor

Now let’s look raised toilet seat heights in the UK

In the UK toilet seats on average are between 14 – 15 inches from the floor to the edge of the toilet bowl.

This means that the raised seats that slot on the toilet are not, on average, going to be as high as the seats on a bedside commode, or a safety frame with an elevated seat – bedside commode seats may be as much as 3 inches than the 6 inch slot on raised toilet seats.

And of course if you can get one the TFI Extra Tall bedside commode is way above everything else at a giddy maximum seat height of 28 inches.

Frames with elevated toilet seat

  • Aidapt Solo Skandia raised toilet seat and frame – max seat height 24 inches
  • Aidapt President raised toilet seat and frame – max seat height 23 1/2 inches
  • Lattice commode toilet seat and frame max seat height 23 1/2 inches
  • Performance health Cosby height adjustable toilet frame and seat – max seat height 23 1/2 inches
  • NRS Mowbry toilet seat and frame – max seat height 21 1/2 inches
  • Homecarft Stirling toilet seat and frame – max seat height 21 inches

Portable bedside commodes

  • TFI Healthcare Extra Tall bedside commode – max seat height 28 inches from floor
  • Drive Medical portable bedside commode – max seat height 22 1/2 inches from floor
  • Medline steel 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 22 1/2 inches from floor
  • KPL 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 21 1/2 inches from floor
  • XWZJY 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 21 1/2 inches from floor
  • LYDB 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 21 inches from floor
  • Fisthgus 3-in-1 portable bedside commode – max seat height 20 1/2 inches from floor

6 Inch raised toilet seats –

  • Drive Raised toilet seat without lid
  • Drive Raised toilet seat with lid
  • Maddack Tall- Ette elevated toilet seat
  • Homecraft Ashby east fit raised toilet seat
  • Homecraft Savannah raised toilet seat
  • Gordon Ellis Serenity raised toilet seat
  • Mobiclinic toilet seat riser, seat with lid
  • Etac Cloo adjustable raised toilet seat without arms

5 Inch raised toilet seats –

  • Drive Medical elevated seat with lock and removable arms
  • Drive DeVilbiss Aquarius elevated seat 2-in-1 with removable arms
  • Gima raised toilet seat with arm rests
  • NRS Healthcare raised toilet seat with arms
  • Ability superstore white Balmoral raised toilet seat without lid
  • Homcom elevated toilet seat with lock and removable padded arms 

How high should a raised toilet seat be ?

To get a basic idea of the height of raised seat that you need –

 

  • it is best to measure from the floor to top of the thigh of the person who needs the raised toilet seat
  • following that, measure the distance of their toilet seat rim to the floor
  • and then subtract this from the first measurement, and you have the elevation required for the raised  toilet seat

What to avoid 

You don’t want the user to have their feet off the ground when they are sitting on the raised toilet seat, nor do you want just their toes touching the floor, as this can lead to a lack of stability when standing back up.

Things that help

It is a good idea to have a walker which the user can hold onto as they back up to the toilet, and as they are transferring their weight to the toilet and the raised seat handles – I wouldn’t use any raised toilet seat which doesn’t either have solid handles, or a frame around it, which you can hold onto as you sit back.

A walker in front of the the person on the raised toilet seat can give extra stability when they stand up as well, as they can transfer their weight from the handles of the toilet seat or frame, over to the walker, and that can lead to fewer injuries and strains.

What should you consider when getting a raised toilet seat for an elderly or frail parent ?

As well as deciding on the correct height of a toilet seat, you really need to decide what is the appropriate type of seat for an elderly or frail parent.

Certain seats, such as “bubble seats” without armrests, or locking device, may be highly inappropriate for an elderly person who is lacking in strength and stability, and who be may be far more suited to, and safe using, a safety frame with an elevated seat, or a portable bedside commode, placed over the toilet bowl.

You need to ask a number of questions before choosing a the raised toilet seat/ toilet riser, such as –

 

  • what is the reason for your elderly parent using the seat ?
  • how old is your parent ?
  • if it is for post-operative rehabilitation, how is your parent physically in the rest of their body ?
  • are they strong ?
  • are they frail ?
  • how good is their sense of balance – do they lurch a lot ?
  • is your parent able to move backwards easily ?
  • does your parent have good vision ?
  • will parent need handles to hold onto when they are sitting down on the seat ?
  • do you think they have the strength to sit back slowly without jolting the seat ?
  • is your parent easily confused ?
  • is your parent lacking in confidence about using a toilet seat ?
  • is your parent generally tired, or “full o’ beans” ?
  • is there any other form of support around the toilet, such as grab bars on the walls, a toilet frame, or a ceiling to floor pole with a handle ?
  • is the bathroom well lit so your parent can see what they are doing ?
  • is your parent using a walker to approach the toilet in reverse, or maybe canes ?

I will use my mom to illustrate my point here.

My mom is –

  • over 90 yrs old
  • was recovering from complete hip replacement surgery
  • she is pretty strong in her arms, but has arthritic hands and a dodgy knee on the good leg
  • Mom suffers from several eye conditions, and has only peripheral vision in one eye
  • my mom’s balance can be a little iffy  because of her eye conditions, and because she suffers from dizziness at times
  • my mom does lurch for things at times, especially when she wakes in the night and has to go to the bathroom

So after her hip replacement my mom needed a raised seat which –

  • had handles which she could reach back to for stability
  • could take the impact if she came back a little too hard, and would not move all over the place i.e. properly attached
  • had some kind of solid structure to grab onto, if mom lost her balance
  • my mom could not slip off
  • was something which gave her confidence to use
  • we also needed a walker which she could grab onto as she stood up

I had purchased an equipment pack for post-operative rehabilitation for my mom, but frankly the raised toilet seat which came with this inspired about as much confidence as a chocolate fire grate.

The seat was the type which has a lip at the back which slips under the rim of the inside of the toilet bowl, and two side clamps, but even when properly attached it was like being at sea in a storm.

We had visions of me finding my mom wedged between the toilet and wall having slipped off, so that was obviously not going to do the job.

Ultimately, we bought a portable bedside commode, not understanding just how great this was, until we realized that if you remove the potty you could then place it over the toilet.

This gives you a seat in a frame, with armrests which is above the toilet bowl.

You just lift up your toilet seat and then place the commode frame over the toilet.

It cannot come off the toilet as it is not attached to it, so is the most stable solution, along with safety frames with raised seats.

The frames come in aluminum, or steel, are very strong and have adjustable heights.

They will fit over almost any toilet.

This also means you can’t pick the wrong height, as you can just change it. The range on most is about 5 inches – I believe 18 – 23 inches for the seat height, but one goes up to 28 inches.

The portable commode was put over our toilet 18 months ago, and it still lives happily over the toilet in our bathroom, and can just be lifted away for other people to use the toilet.

The purpose of this passage was just to illustrate that, if you are trying to decide what height raised seat you need, that should not be your only consideration.

Summing Up…

The highest raised toilet seat is 28 inches from the floor if you place the TFI Healthcare Extra Tall bedside commode over your toilet.

But the height of the seat should not be your only consideration, especially with elderly parents.

You should be looking at all the different parameters of the situation in which you are using an elevated toilet seat.

I hope this helps. 

Good  luck !

I’m Gareth and I’m the owner of Looking After Mom and Dad.com

I have been a caregiver for over 10 yrs and share all my tips here.

Gareth Williams

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What is the highest raised toilet seat ? With 46 examples
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A list of the highest raised toilet seats, whom they suit and how to use them properly - with over 46 examples
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